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Articles

paradoxica

Published in Volume 5 of Paradoxica Spring 2013.

Summary: The author explores his own attempts at healing from trauma, which led to an embracement of a nondual psychotherapy approach. He explains how catharsis therapy, psychodrama, and somatic experiencing, while initially helpful, did not facilitate a full healing. By moving to incorporate a choiceless awareness perspective, the author found he was able to drop his judgments about the trauma experience, facilitating dissolution of the trauma experience. This discussion is then extended to letting go of the grasping at survival and the separate self, accepting death, and then even psychic hell. Three case studies are shared to show how a nondual therapy approach can be used to work with some dark traumas.

paradoxica

Published in Volume 4 of Paradoxica Spring 2012.

Summary: This article is a summary of a nondual psychotherapy session with a long time spiritual seeker of 40 years who had worked hard on a meditative path with a guru, but had not experienced an awakening. In the session, he is introduced to some nondual pointers to help him realize that it is all available right here, right now, he has to only see it. Over reliance on another, letting go of effort, embracing no knowing, realizing nothing can be done, coming to the end of seeking and stopping, sitting in one’s own awareness, abiding in consciousness, and taking the ultimate medicine are all reviewed to invite the long term seeker to see “this is it.”

paradoxica

Published in Volume 3 of Paradoxica Spring 2011.

Summary: In this article, challenges after awakening are considered. While being in the awakened flow can be very captivating, we see issues of the mind, the heart, and the guts may still emerge that need to be worked through. The mind can fixate on the witness state or attach itself to nothingness or to the concept of awakening. These fixated positions, beneath which lay the dark emotions of the heart, must be recognized, openly embraced and collapsed. By burning through the stories around these emotions, we can reclaim our openness of the heart and our ability to come from a place of love rather than from the illusion of the separate self. Connecting with all at a gut level, we can be in a place of let go, no longer grasping at self survival as we embrace existence in each moment.

paradoxica

Tzu, G. (2012). International Journal of Mental Health & Addiction, 10(3), 407-427.

Summary: In this article, we look at how an addicted person can through the therapeutic process replace the addiction“short cut”counterfeit quest for wholeness with an authentic quest for wholeness using Wilber’ transpersonal spectrum of development model by working through different developmental levels during three stages of recovery. The first stage of recovery focuses on abstinence. A second stage of recovery beyond abstinence is called for of embracing and working through the emotional underbelly beneath the addictive process. Eventually, a third phase of recovery can be worked on which entails letting go of the addiction to the separate self and the mind by embracing nondual living. Wilber’s transpersonal model of development is utilized including ten stages, and three overall phases of development including: prepersonal, personal, and transpersonal. Possible pathologies and treatment interventions are reviewed for each level including specific addiction and recovery implications for. Throughout this article, case studies and anecdotal accounts from past clients will be used to better exemplify this process.

paradoxica

Published in Volume 2 of Paradoxica Spring 2010.

Summary: This article reviews how the nondual seeker comes to the point in the journey in which he or she realizes that the end of seeking is called for but instead begins to seek the end of seeking. As the experience of desperately coming to the end of the line intensifies with no resolution, the experiences of the rot, absolute hopelessness, and embracing total failurehood, can set the stage for a spontaneous giving up and letting go. In this surrender, the death of the separate self occurs, and the person can come to a place of seeing that “this is it,” it is all available right here, right now, and has been all along. A nondual psychotherapy case study illustrates the point that an invitation can be made by the nondual therapist to the client to simply rest in this state of nothing to do and nowhere to go. The temptation to run from this state, which we have been avoiding our whole lives, can be monumental. Resting in this desperate state of nothing to do can be a vital opportunity to see through the illusion of the separate self, and to know that reality has always been available, right here, right now

paradoxica

Published in Volume 1 of Paradoxica Spring 2009.

Summary: This article summarizes the pivotal task of moving into nondual awareness by seeing through the veil of the separate self. Formerly this nondual state was understood as the final stage in an arduous journey of ego-transcendence; but nondual psychotherapists are now recognizing this nondual state as readily available to clients as part of the therapeutic process. The first author recounts his own journey of seeing through the illusion of the separate self and embracing nondual awareness. Following this, he presents a nondual psychotherapy case study describing the process of a client having an awakening experience – the letting go of her egoic separate self in the moment – and her subsequent realization that surrendering is not a one-time event but an ongoing process.

paradoxica

Tzu, G. & Theriault, B. (2012). International Journal of Mental Health & Addiction, 10(3), 368-385.

Summary: This article describes the process of working through the“dry drunk” second stage of sexual addiction recovery through transforming the narcissistic“Master of the Universe”personality into the experience of nondual being using the Almaas Diamond Approach of self-realization. The Diamond Approach is a transpersonal informed psychology synthesizing western psychology with eastern spiritual wisdom where self-realization is experienced as an awakened nondual presence at the core of human consciousness. Narcissism is the barrier to this realization. The narcissistic personality structure found within the sex addict if not worked through in recovery does not allow the person to see the bottom of sexual addiction and move into emotional sobriety in a second phase of recovery. Accepting the experience of dissolving the narcissistic separate self and embracing nondual being opens one up to the absolute ordinariness of pure awareness; the true nature of who and what we are. A case study is used to illustrate the usefulness of Almaas’ Diamond Approach in transforming the narcissism of a client who had been immobolized in the second phase of sexual addiction recovery for 4 years.